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8. Sneakers (High-Tops)

Thirty years ago, a man knew what was meant by the term “dress shoes.” They were the lace-up shoes he wore with a suit – sturdy, plain and designed not to stand out. Oxfords were always “closed laced” – in other words, the two parts of the upper that are drawn together by the laces were sewn under the front part of the shoe. Classic Oxfords still follow that pattern, made with an undecorated vamp, stitched welts and leather soles. They may or may not have a toe cap.

TOE STYLES

 

Plain Toe

Thirty years ago, a man knew what was meant by the term “dress shoes.” They were the lace-up shoes he wore with a suit – sturdy, plain and designed not to stand out. Oxfords were always “closed laced” – in other words, the two parts of the upper that are drawn together by the laces were sewn under the front part of the shoe. Classic Oxfords still follow that pattern, made with an undecorated vamp, stitched welts and leather soles. They may or may not have a toe cap.

Cap Toe

Thirty years ago, a man knew what was meant by the term “dress shoes.” They were the lace-up shoes he wore with a suit – sturdy, plain and designed not to stand out. Oxfords were always “closed laced” – in other words, the two parts of the upper that are drawn together by the laces were sewn under the front part of the shoe. Classic Oxfords still follow that pattern, made with an undecorated vamp, stitched welts and leather soles. They may or may not have a toe cap.

Wingtip

Thirty years ago, a man knew what was meant by the term “dress shoes.” They were the lace-up shoes he wore with a suit – sturdy, plain and designed not to stand out. Oxfords were always “closed laced” – in other words, the two parts of the upper that are drawn together by the laces were sewn under the front part of the shoe. Classic Oxfords still follow that pattern, made with an undecorated vamp, stitched welts and leather soles. They may or may not have a toe cap.

Brogue

Thirty years ago, a man knew what was meant by the term “dress shoes.” They were the lace-up shoes he wore with a suit – sturdy, plain and designed not to stand out. Oxfords were always “closed laced” – in other words, the two parts of the upper that are drawn together by the laces were sewn under the front part of the shoe. Classic Oxfords still follow that pattern, made with an undecorated vamp, stitched welts and leather soles. They may or may not have a toe cap.

Plain

Thirty years ago, a man knew what was meant by the term “dress shoes.” They were the lace-up shoes he wore with a suit – sturdy, plain and designed not to stand out. Oxfords were always “closed laced” – in other words, the two parts of the upper that are drawn together by the laces were sewn under the front part of the shoe. Classic Oxfords still follow that pattern, made with an undecorated vamp, stitched welts and leather soles. They may or may not have a toe cap.

MATERIALS

 

Leather

Thirty years ago, a man knew what was meant by the term “dress shoes.” They were the lace-up shoes he wore with a suit – sturdy, plain and designed not to stand out. Oxfords were always “closed laced” – in other words, the two parts of the upper that are drawn together by the laces were sewn under the front part of the shoe. Classic Oxfords still follow that pattern, made with an undecorated vamp, stitched welts and leather soles. They may or may not have a toe cap.

Patent Leather

Thirty years ago, a man knew what was meant by the term “dress shoes.” They were the lace-up shoes he wore with a suit – sturdy, plain and designed not to stand out. Oxfords were always “closed laced” – in other words, the two parts of the upper that are drawn together by the laces were sewn under the front part of the shoe. Classic Oxfords still follow that pattern, made with an undecorated vamp, stitched welts and leather soles. They may or may not have a toe cap.

Suede

Thirty years ago, a man knew what was meant by the term “dress shoes.” They were the lace-up shoes he wore with a suit – sturdy, plain and designed not to stand out. Oxfords were always “closed laced” – in other words, the two parts of the upper that are drawn together by the laces were sewn under the front part of the shoe. Classic Oxfords still follow that pattern, made with an undecorated vamp, stitched welts and leather soles. They may or may not have a toe cap.

Canvas

Thirty years ago, a man knew what was meant by the term “dress shoes.” They were the lace-up shoes he wore with a suit – sturdy, plain and designed not to stand out. Oxfords were always “closed laced” – in other words, the two parts of the upper that are drawn together by the laces were sewn under the front part of the shoe. Classic Oxfords still follow that pattern, made with an undecorated vamp, stitched welts and leather soles. They may or may not have a toe cap.

Patent

Thirty years ago, a man knew what was meant by the term “dress shoes.” They were the lace-up shoes he wore with a suit – sturdy, plain and designed not to stand out. Oxfords were always “closed laced” – in other words, the two parts of the upper that are drawn together by the laces were sewn under the front part of the shoe. Classic Oxfords still follow that pattern, made with an undecorated vamp, stitched welts and leather soles. They may or may not have a toe cap.

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