Close
Skip to content Skipto navigation

Enamel

Porcelain enamel is made by melting powdered glass. As it hardens, the enamel adheres to metal and creates a hard, shiny coating. This technique is used not only for jewellery, but painting and other artwork as well. This decorative finish lends colour to many men’s accessories, including cufflinks, tie bars and money clips.

Espadrilles

Espadrilles may have originated in the 14th century, but they still look fresh every summer. Their distinctive jute sole and canvas upper make them perfect for casual wear. Developed for the climate in the south of France, you can be sure that your feet will stay cool in every sense of the word as you go about your day.

Fair Isle Sweater

The Fair Isle sweater is a sleeveless, often V-necked sweater knitted with a technique created in Fair Isle, one of the Shetland Islands in Scotland’s far north. Its distinction is the use of coloured wools knitted into elaborate patterns (five colours traditionally) and its devotees range from the Duke of Windsor (who wore one to play golf) and the Monty Python character, Mr. Gumby.

Fedora

The fedora is a style of hat made of soft felt with a centre crease and a wide brim that can be turned up or down. The name comes from the title of a play, Fédora, written in 1882 by Victorien Sardou as a vehicle for the great French actress, Sarah Bernhardt, who wore such a hat in the play.

Field Jacket

Another staple of the modern man’s wardrobe that has evolved from military use, the field jacket is quintessentially rugged and masculine, and is perfect for days off, weekends in the country and sports events. The M65 style, originally issued to American soldiers to wear in Vietnam, remains popular, and the loose fit, waterproofing and abundance of pockets makes any field jacket a worthwhile investment.

Flannel

Flannel is a napped woolen or worsted cloth that takes its name from the Welsh word for the fabric, gwlanen. It is best known in the context of grey flannel pants, one of the traditionally smarter accompaniments to a navy blazer. But be careful if you go shopping for “a pair of flannels” in England: there, flannel also means “facecloth.” Cotton flannel is usually reserved for sportsmen’s shirts and trousers, prized for its breathability.

Foulard Pattern

This common tie pattern features various geometric shapes in repeating patterns like squares to diamonds and, for the stylish, flamingos or scooters. Originally the pattern was only found on lightweight foulard fabric but is now on silk and knit ties.

French Cuff

French cuffs are a more formal dress shirt style, fastened with cufflinks or silk knots. These cuffs are folded back on themselves, and the cufflinks press the cuff together and fasten them together. This cuff style is appropriate for business, semi-formal and formal events.

Fur

This country was founded on the trade of beaver pelts, and we’ve been swaddling ourselves in fur ever since. Soft, warm and luxurious, fur linings and trimmings for coats, gloves and hats are great for guys on chilly winter days. If you’re opposed to real fur, there are a number of excellent synthetic options that come close to the real thing.

loading